Finding new workers crucial to the economy

December 26, 2017

Vermont Business Magazine

Vermont Teddy Bear President Bill Shouldice doesn't take a break from his shift on the packing line at the Shelburne plant to explain the dilemma his company faces. On the one hand, sales are great.

Vermont Teddy Bear President Bill Shouldice doesn't take a break from his shift on the packing line at the Shelburne plant to explain the dilemma his company faces. On the one hand, sales are great.

You couldn't play Pandora before Christmas without hearing about PajamaGram, another VTB brand. On the other hand, he needs seasonal workers in a region of the state in which the unemployment rate hovers around 2 percent. You couldn't listen to local radio without hearing Shouldice in an ad looking for employees.

"We need 600," Shouldice said two Saturdays before Christmas.

Vermont Teddy Bear isn't the only place looking for workers. Shouldice is competing with other seasonal employers, such as retailers before Christmas and the ski resorts right through his peak selling time from the holiday season, through Valentine's Day, and all the way to Mother's Day.

Want ads across the state are pitching not just seasonal employment, but are looking for everyone from medical professionals and engineers to full time manufacturing and everything in-between. Vermont is desperate for workers.

According to figures compiled by the Vermont Chamber’s Vermont Futures Project, of which Shouldice is chair, Vermont retains about 3,500 high school graduates and 4,500 college graduates. Still, 11,375 Vermonters retire and 4,800 new jobs are created.

Add the average number of part-time positions that become full-time (1,200), people who leave Vermont whose positions need filling (1,000), and the number of temporary positions that needs to be replaced (600), and you have an annual requirement of 18,975 workers.

Do the math, that's a gap of 10,975 workers.

Meanwhile, Dustin Degree and Sarah Buxton on behalf of the state are charged with leaving no rock unturned in an effort to find workers at every skill level for a Vermont economy that is, frankly, doing quite well, with the caveat “at the moment.” The pressure brought by a tight labor market, however, is and will put tremendous pressure on the state to grow and thrive.

Governor Phil Scott knows it will not grow and thrive under the current labor conditions, which is why he hired the two former legislators to find a way to get more people into the workforce.

“The economic impacts are huge for the state,” Degree said. The governor has a goal of adding 2,200 workers to the labor force every year.

Degree and Buxton will start with an entire population of potential workers that has been largely overlooked: Vermonters.

Buxton calls it the “participation rate.” While Vermont has a relatively high percentage of its in situ population working (64.8 percent against a US average of 59.7 percent), other states, including New Hampshire, are higher (66.7 percent). Even just 3 percent would represent over 10,000 new workers in Vermont.

Several factors are involved in this. As it was across the nation, the Great Recession of nearly a decade ago led to people dropping out of the workforce. Perhaps they retired early or were the “trailing spouse” in a two-income household and simply never rejoined the labor force.

If you’re not looking for work, you don’t count, literally, as a member of the labor force. This also makes the unemployment rate look falsely better because the labor force is the denominator when doing the math.

Potential workers are also harder to find.

“If they’re not looking for work, we don’t know who they are,” Degree said.

The simple truth is that if you want to judge the economy through the broad measures of the monthly employment report, you’d want the labor force to be increasing, along with the number of total employed, while, of course, the number of unemployed is decreasing. Even if that increase in the labor force results in a higher unemployment rate.

(Vermont’s unemployment rate in October was 2.9 percent, tied for sixth lowest in the nation; the labor force is exactly where it was a year ago, but the number of employed has grown by 1,050. The fall in the unemployed population saves the state money in unemployment insurance costs. During the Great Recession, the state’s trust fund ran out of money and it had to borrow from the federal government in order to pay jobless benefits.)

Another significant factor, Buxton said, has been a low participation rate by Millennials, the generation now entering working age in great numbers. They work less than previous generations. Millennials take a lot of shine from their elders, especially Baby Boomers, but this is no joke.

Buxton explained that to a large extent they’re going to school at some level, but not working part-time at the same percentage as previous generations.

Degree said that the single greatest need in the Vermont job market at the moment is for cashiers, the typical domain of the young, part-time worker. For an American economy predicated on consumerism, this is a significant problem for the workforce.

The want ads and cardboard “Help Wanted” signs are nearly everywhere in the state and Degree and Buxton are looking not just at the tight labor markets in Chittenden and Franklin counties and in the Upper Valley, but across the state.

So, where do you start?

“We start everywhere,” Buxton said. Degree said they are attacking this problem with “a sense of urgency… I think the governor is open to everything.”

Manufacturing is searching, tech jobs are left begging and engineers are needed.

While including the needs of the entire state, they will look for solutions at the regional level.

For instance, the Rutland region is heavily invested in manufacturing and hospitality, while housing affordability is a significant problem for the labor force in Chittenden County, which then leads to a significant transportation problem as workers move farther away from their workplace, which then creates a significant problem with housing affordability in neighboring counties.

Governor Scott’s 6-3-1 mantra (he even has a license plate) identifies the core problems he seeks to address: On average every day, Vermont loses six workers and three students, while one baby a day is born to an opiate addicted mother.

Vermont already has essentially zero population growth.

While Vermont has an affordability problem as the second worst in terms of income-to-housing, it also has a demographic issue. The state is the whitest and second oldest. Entire countries like Italy and Japan have similar problems with low birth rates and an aging, homogenous population.

Along with looking for workers right here at home, Buxton said the state will also look for opportunities to grow the workforce with “new Americans.”

Recruitment of established adult workers from other states is expensive, but Buxton said Vermont has had its best success with people who have already had some connection with Vermont: The grew up here, went to college here, vacationed here, visited family here. The state has studied this issue and has and will focus its recruitment on this group.

Retention will be another aspect of their efforts, Degree said. Vermont is an importer of college students, so how do you keep them here? They’re a different generation and don’t have the same vision, at least not yet, of a home in the suburbs with a lawn to mow. They’re looking for a job and a life.

In any case, housing availability and affordability is a constant issue, whether it’s a kid out of college or for a family wanting to move back.

Competition for workers exits within the state – just look at the “Help Wanted” signs – and nationally.

According to the National Federation of Independent Business, 45 percent of business owners reported that they were unable to find qualified applicants to fill job openings in the first quarter of 2017. During that same period, the national unemployment rate, which was down from previous years, was roughly 4.7 percent.

While the numbers suggest that there are people available to fill the positions, the problem actually lies in what is known as the “skills gap,” which occurs when there is a disconnect between the skills an employer needs to fill critical positions and what prospective employees are equipped to do.

Here in Vermont, where the unemployment rate has reached an all-time low and more employees are aging out of the workforce, business owners are feeling the acute effects of the skills gap.

According to Joan Goldstein, Commissioner of the Vermont Department of Economic Development, “The biggest problem facing the state is the lack of a qualified workforce and its impact on economic development.”

Goldstein heads up the DED, a branch of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development, which is focused on helping business not only start in Vermont but also grow and prosper in the state. She said that, “In order to do help businesses succeed in Vermont, the skills gap must be addressed.”

Part of the job of her department is to come up with solutions to this growing problem, and one such solution comes by way of the DED’s Vermont Training Program (VTP).

VTP is a grant program that provides Vermont businesses with performance based grants through a reimbursement process for the training of new hires and incumbent workers.

Training can fall into categories such as on-the-job, classroom, or other specialized training as well as work-based learning programs for Vermont students. The program has been vital for many businesses across the state including Casella Waste Systems, GW Plastics, American Meadows, Butterworks Farm, and more.

“The Vermont Training Program has been instrumental in helping Vermont businesses grow and succeed,” said Goldstein. “The grants have allowed new businesses to move here, helped existing businesses retrain their workforce, and have ensured Vermonters have the skills they need to succeed as well.”

Another way the DED is working to bridge the skills gap is through the Vermont Talent Pipeline Management (VTPM) project, a collaborative initiative between the DED, Vermont Business Roundtable, Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce, Franklin Grand Isle Workforce Investment Board, and Brattleboro Development Credit Corporation.

The program is designed to tackle the workforce shortage by rethinking the way employers and educators work together.

Last fall, the VTPM group learned of a new approach to workforce development during a presentation by the US Chamber of Commerce that was built off lessons learned from supply-chain management, specifically looking at employers as the end-users of the education system.

Taking that information, the group set to work to create a statewide program in Vermont to help the state’s growing skills gap. The goal of VTPM is to better align an industry’s critical skills needs with the current educational programs being offered.

When employers become very explicit about the skills needed to fill key roles in their industry, they are better able to equip educational partners with the information they need to improve and expand current programs.

VTPM has since launched two pilot programs – one in construction and one in healthcare – and have started identifying the top skills needed to fill critical positions in these sectors.

Goldstein said, “The entire process is collaborative in nature and that for change to occur there needs to be a consensus across the board in regard to job descriptions and needs.”

The VTPM project is in its early stages, and Goldstein understands there is still work to be done.

“We know we can’t bite off everything at once, but this is a step in solving this problem to ensure Vermont businesses can thrive and grow,” she said.

The programs Goldstein mentioned, which rely on much federal funding, are a crucial part of the multi-departmental effort that Degree and Buxton are tasked with leading.

Scott appointed the bipartisan duo of former legislators in mid-November to strengthen and coordinate his Administration’s initiatives to expand the size of Vermont’s workforce.

State Senator Dustin Degree (R-Franklin) will serve as special assistant to the governor and executive director of workforce expansion. Former State Representative Sarah Buxton (D-Windsor-Orange 1) will assume the new role of director of workforce policy and performance within the Vermont Department of Labor (VDOL).

“Growing and strengthening our workforce is the most important goal we have as we work to grow our economy, make Vermont more affordable and protect the most vulnerable. Increasing the size of our workforce is central to our ability to make investments in the priorities of our state,” Scott said. “Dustin and Sarah’s experience, commitment to service and strong relationships with the Legislature will be valuable as we work to expand the size of our workforce and achieve real and measurable results.”

Degree said they’re in a politically advantageous position because workforce growth and development is “not a partisan issue.”

Degree also will serve as the executive director of the statewide Workforce Development Board, a 58-member panel charged with coordinating workforce training and education programs and engaging the state’s employers, workers and other partners.

Buxton will be responsible for simplifying and streamlining programs, processes and systems at VDOL to improve outcomes and better measure results. She will also ensure compliance with federal requirements, including the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

"We cannot afford, nor can our economy sustain, a workforce that continues to shrink by about six workers every day – we simply must reverse this trend. To do so, we must implement more effective and efficient ways to educate and train Vermonters, so we can put more people to work. We also need to work with employers to recruit more working families to our state,” said Labor Commissioner Lindsay Kurrle.

She said that appointing Degree and Buxton will bring “the exact kind of energy and experience we need to strengthen and expand Vermont’s workforce, and create more and better paying jobs."

Scott will appoint a replacement to serve out the remainder of Degree’s term. Buxton already was in the Administration and has worked on workforce issues at VDOL since March.

While they are already experienced for their new tasks, they are also young and local, which is no coincidence.

Degree, 32, has served in the Vermont State Senate since 2015, representing Franklin County and Alburgh. In 2017, he was unanimously selected by the Republican caucus to serve as Senate Minority Leader, and he’s served on the Senate Finance, Transportation and Rules committees. Degree served as the director of communications for Mansfield Heliflight from 2015-2016.

He was a member of the startup team for NG Advantage – a company that delivers compressed natural gas to high-usage companies not served on a natural gas pipeline – and worked as a project consultant for the company.

He served in the Vermont House of Representatives from 2010-2012, and in the Office of Governor Jim Douglas from 2008-2010. Degree is a resident of St Albans, a graduate of Bellows Free Academy and the Tilton School, and attended both Norwich University and the University of Vermont.

Buxton, 39, has served as the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) policy and implementation analyst at VDOL since March. In this role, she worked closely with the Workforce Development Board, establishing key policies and procedures for the Department and leading the coordination of 18 federally funded programs to create a comprehensive “One-Stop” employment service delivery network in Vermont in July.

In 2010, Buxton was elected to the Vermont House of Representatives, serving three terms as the representative for Tunbridge and Royalton. A native Vermonter, Buxton resides in Tunbridge, earned her BA from the University of Vermont, and JD from Vermont Law School.

Vermont Futures Project, born out of the Vermont Chamber of Commerce, has identified a nearly 11,000-person workforce supply gap.

“The Vermont Futures Project has done the analysis and recognizes the need to put the workforce as a priority for economic growth. We applaud Governor Scott for not only emphasizing the need to strengthen Vermont’s workforce by focusing on the skills gap but also bringing attention to the need to increase the workforce supply,” said Shouldice.

The Vermont Futures Project, similar to Scott’s analysis, has estimated that only about 8,000 people enter the workforce annually, but employers have a need for 10,975 workers due to a modest rate of growth, retirements, and replacement of temporary workers and those that have migrated out of state.

The Vermont Futures Project promotes the long-term economic health of Vermont. It has created an economic data dashboard to provide leaders important metrics to understand and measure progress in securing Vermont’s economic future.   

March 19, 2018
Consumer protection bill clears Senate committee
March 19, 2018
Report looks at child care, the economy and gender equity in Vermont
March 5, 2018
A Small Town Kept Walmart Out. Now It Faces Amazon.
March 5, 2018
Survey: Vermont businesses show mild uptick in economy
March 2, 2018
Tops shoppers help to buy 3 million meals for families in need
March 1, 2018
Stewart's Shops to Invest $50M in New Builds, Rebuilds & Renovations in 2018
March 1, 2018
Vermont Cider Company Launches New Tank Series with Release of Woodchuck Pear Ginger
February 28, 2018
VRGA gets workforce development grant
February 26, 2018
7 retail execs envision the future of stores
February 26, 2018
International fashion retailer H&M to open first Vermont location
February 21, 2018
Vermont Hard Cider and Pabst to End Partnership
February 20, 2018
Red Fox Shop in Wilmington sells local wine, beers, wares Read more: Deerfield Valley News - Red Fox Shop in Wilmington sells local wine beers wares
February 20, 2018
Higher income, healthier groceries
February 20, 2018
How The Home Depot Is Using Tech to Attract Workers
February 19, 2018
Steve Moyer & Patrick Crowl: Minimum wage, a business perspective
February 19, 2018
Commentary: The changing face of retail
February 19, 2018
Sen­ate ad­vances $15 min­i­mum wage bill
February 15, 2018
Commentary: Expanding the labor force is essential
February 15, 2018
February 15, 2018
Member of the Month: The World
February 13, 2018
City Market Recognized with Workplace Awards
February 9, 2018
Retailers, despite store closures, predict higher sales
February 8, 2018
Senate to vote next week on $15 minimum wage hike
February 6, 2018
Richards Group to acquire Centurion Insurance from Mascoma BankRichards Group to acquire Centurion Insurance from Mascoma Bank
February 5, 2018
Governor challenges legislator pooh-poohing Labor Force problem
February 2, 2018
Super Senior: June Waite and Jerrilyn Remillard
February 1, 2018
The changing world of retail: 4 ways to defend against Amazon
January 31, 2018
Lauzon pushes plan to license Barre pot growers
January 31, 2018
Eric Polep to President and Chief Executive Officer J. Polep Distribution Services
January 30, 2018
City Market Signs Sales Agreement with Petra Cliffs
January 29, 2018
Vermont businesses have good reason to hang on to employees
January 29, 2018
Panera Bread on Church St. closing, Outdoor Gear Exchange to expand
January 29, 2018
Neighbors Band Together in Effort to Revive Brownsville Store
January 29, 2018
KeHE Brings On Trend™ Flavors to Winter Fancy Food Show
January 26, 2018
Donovan: Working for Vermont businesses, legislative update
January 25, 2018
Training high on list in Workforce Development Working Group report
January 24, 2018
Governor Scott presents balanced budget, no tax or fee hike
January 23, 2018
Ashe And Scott Spar Over Plan To Raise Minimum Wage To $15 An Hour
January 19, 2018
Natural Foods Co-op Celebrates Expansion
January 19, 2018
28 Retail Marketing Predictions To Watch In 2018
January 18, 2018
50 businesses named as Best Places to Work in Vermont 2018
January 18, 2018
Business growth program open to 20 VT entrepreneurs
January 17, 2018
C-Stores Appeal to Health-Conscious Consumers
January 16, 2018
Member of the Month: Dan & Whit's General Store
January 15, 2018
Walmart raises wages, handing out bonuses
January 11, 2018
Vermont Senate passes, governor expected to sign, bill making pot legal for adults
January 8, 2018
Macy's announces 5,000 job cuts, 7 new store closures
January 5, 2018
Scott wants to attract more workers
January 5, 2018
Progressives renew push for $15 wage as heart of economic agenda
January 4, 2018
Johnson opens session with pitch to pull together on problems
January 2, 2018
Onion River staff not giving up
January 2, 2018
Vt. Lawmakers to talk pot promptly
January 2, 2018
SIAL Canada Launches U.S.-Hosted Buyer Program
January 1, 2018
VRGA Honors Members of 30+ Years
December 28, 2017
2017 business winners and losers
December 28, 2017
Big labor sees growth potential in California pot workers
December 27, 2017
Country Stores Provide Timeless Taste of Vermont
December 26, 2017
Finding new workers crucial to the economy
December 26, 2017
7-Eleven Tries Out Mobile Ordering and Delivery with New App
December 26, 2017
The Evolving Role of Store Associates in an Automated Retail World
December 26, 2017
Retailers Feel Shoppers’ Christmas Cheer
December 20, 2017
Northeast Kingdom Fund provides $63,000 in grants
December 20, 2017
City Market Donates Proceeds from 20th Annual Tree Sale
December 19, 2017
Up to $60,000 available through Local Food Market Development Grant program
December 13, 2017
USA News Group: Vermont likely to legalize pot in 2018
December 13, 2017
Community Bank donates $2,500 to Vermont Foodbank
December 13, 2017
December 11, 2017
Benson Village Store has new owners
December 8, 2017
How Dollar General Became Rural America’s Store of Choice
December 7, 2017
Independent grocers still challenged after recession
December 4, 2017
Power of One: Brands Building From Focus on Single Ingredient
November 21, 2017
Development Corp. Helps With New Facility for LEDdynamics
November 21, 2017
November 21, 2017
Vermont’s workforce dilemma
November 20, 2017
November 20, 2017
November 17, 2017
5 Ways to Market Your Business for the Holiday Season
November 15, 2017
Real von Trapps competing with modern Vermont hotels
November 15, 2017
Onion River Co-op Past and Present, and a Preview of the New Store
November 14, 2017
Can local businesses compete with Amazon?
November 14, 2017
City Market Opens South End Co-op
November 13, 2017
3SquaresVT Challenge Kicks Off
November 7, 2017
Gifford’s Strode Independent Living receives Efficiency Vermont cash incentive
November 2, 2017
What to expect from the revitalization of the Burlington Town Center
October 31, 2017
$1M to boost local businesses
October 25, 2017
New initiative links education and training to Vermont’s future workforce and economic needs
October 24, 2017
Amazon's Stealth Takeover of Vermont
October 24, 2017
October 23, 2017
Governor Scott launches ThinkVermont to grow economy
October 23, 2017
The Place to Live, Work, and Shop
October 20, 2017
Vermont businesses credit 25 percent of sales to Amazon
October 19, 2017
Target comes to University Mall
October 19, 2017
City Market donates $30,000 to support the Vermont food system
October 18, 2017
Shelburne's Village Wine and Coffee to Expand
October 17, 2017
October 12, 2017
Governor calls for 'sense of urgency' for expanding Vermont’s workforce
October 11, 2017
Donovan: Protecting Vermonters after Equifax
October 6, 2017
Vermont ranks in top five for energy efficiency
October 6, 2017
What Section 179 Expensing Means for Your Business
October 5, 2017
Scott signs proclamation designating October as Employee Ownership Month
October 2, 2017
2017-2018 Windham Region CEDS Update
October 2, 2017
Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Northern New England closes on significant acquisition of new territory in Northeast
September 27, 2017
SNAP Is an Important Public-Private Partnership
September 22, 2017
Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food & Markets Announces Over $1M in Available Grant Funds
September 6, 2017
Amid federal uncertainty, state employer regulations on the rise
September 4, 2017
Stormwater permits could be costly for some
September 1, 2017
Chicago-area soda tax may carry political price for backers
August 8, 2017
Governor Announces Formation of Interagency Committee on Chemical Management
August 1, 2017
Washington Post: Sobering news for $15 minimum-wage boosters
August 1, 2017
Vermont Department of Taxes Launches a Listening Tour for Small Businesses
July 26, 2017
NYT: Who Wants to Run the Mom-and-Pop Market? Almost No One
July 25, 2017
Retailers Welcome Move Toward More Balanced Overtime Update
July 19, 2017
America’s Retail Champion of the Year
June 26, 2017
Harpoon releases 2017 PMC Beer
May 3, 2017
J. Polep Announces Their Recent Acquisition
March 13, 2017
11th Annual Vermont Organics Recycling Summit
February 14, 2017
January 18, 2017
Vermont Health Connect Announces Key Dates for Open Enrollment
January 11, 2017
Retailers Say U.S. Supreme Court Should Rule in Favor of Free Speech on Credit Card Fees
December 22, 2016
December 15, 2016
Internet-tax case could change online shopping
December 12, 2016
650 Grocery Bags of Healthy Food to Central Vermonters
December 9, 2016
Hunger Mountain Co-op's Annual Holiday Grocery Pack
December 5, 2016
Predicting Where Retailers Will Focus Their Energy in 2017
November 28, 2016
Retailers Made Black Friday Irresistible for Consumers with Great Deals, Online and In-Store
November 22, 2016
C&S Charities Donates 1.7 million to Pediatric Cancer and Childhood Hunger
November 21, 2016
5 Ways To Convert Holiday Shoppers Into Loyal Customers
November 18, 2016
137.4 Million Consumers Plan to Shop Thanksgiving Weekend
November 14, 2016
Mandatory Bag Reuse Program Huge Success at Vermont Specialty Food Market
November 9, 2016
Top 25 retail industry websites
November 2, 2016
October 21, 2016
Members Supporting Local Food Sales
October 4, 2016
National Retail Federation Forecasts Holiday Sales to Increase 3.6%
September 27, 2016
ImageTek Labels Expands Digital Printing Capabilities With Jetrion 4900M-330
September 23, 2016
Meat Grinding Record Keeping Requirement
September 22, 2016
Halloween Spending to Reach $8.4 Billion, Highest in Survey History
September 21, 2016
Farrell Distributing along with Leunig’s Bistro & 12 local restaurants to raise money for the UVMMC Breast Care Center
September 19, 2016
Dick Barnes Recognized for Long-term Service to Vermont
August 29, 2016
Survey Finds Seven in 10 Small Retailers ‘Overwhelmed’ By Government Regulations, Mandates
August 23, 2016
Cabot partnership to help Food, Farms & Forests Fund
August 11, 2016
Vermont will not enforce GE Food Labeling Law
August 2, 2016
Woodstock Farmers’ Market Gold Barn Honoree
July 26, 2016
National Retail Federation Upgrades 2016 Economic Forecast
July 21, 2016
Back-to-School and College Spending to Reach $75.8 Billion
July 1, 2016
NRF Welcomes Appeals Court Ruling Against Disputed Credit Card Swipe Fee Settlement
June 30, 2016
Vermont’s earned sick leave law
June 16, 2016
2016 Scholarship Recipients Named
June 15, 2016
City Market considers next phase of expansion
May 26, 2016
Congressman Welch Honored as NRF Legislator of the Year
May 25, 2016
NRF Recognizes Legislators of the Year
May 16, 2016
#ShopNaked at the Woodstock Farmers Market
May 13, 2016
Walmart suing Visa over chip card
May 11, 2016
From Seeds To Sweets, Small Businesses Are A Winning Formula In Lamoille County
May 11, 2016
City Market Job Opening - Director of Operations
May 5, 2016
Sherman and Trombley of Stowe Mercantile are VRGA Persons of the Year
April 27, 2016
Americans to Spoil Mom this Mother's Day
April 11, 2016
The House passes a resolution honoring Bethany Berger
April 4, 2016
A Hannaford Supermarkets program surpasses 2 significant milestones
March 30, 2016
A Vanilla shortage?
March 18, 2016
Vermont Pickle on Local 22 & Local 44
March 10, 2016
Best Bagger 2016
March 7, 2016
Onion River Co-op partners with Mansfield Cooperative to save Underhill Country Store
March 7, 2016
14 Vermont businesses receive $14,000 to attend national trade shows
March 1, 2016
Bethany Berger takes home 2nd place!
February 26, 2016
Only ONE booth left!
December 4, 2015
It's Scholarship Time!
October 6, 2015
Gubernatorial Candidates to Judge Vermont Bagging Championship
September 29, 2015
FDA Issues Orders
July 22, 2015
Three Vermont Businesses named America’s Retail Champions
Board of Directors
VRGA Staff
Member to Member
Employment Posters
Monthly Newsletter
About VRGA
Legislative Affairs
Site Map
Vermont Retail & Grocers Association
148 State Street
Montpelier, Vermont 05602

Telephone: 802-839-1928
Fax: 802-839-1927
Email: info@vtrga.org